Maternal Child Lifestages and Environmental Health

Life course research is an approach for considering the complex ways in which exposures can affect subsequent health.  Exposures may have many ways in which they can affect various health outcomes – a single exposure at just the right time (e.g., prenatal programming), a series of exposure events in a particular sequence, a mixture of exposures or even a cumulative dose of an exposure can lead to changes in an individual's health trajectory.  Through strong study design, excellent exposure measurement and cutting-edge statistical techniques, we can begin to understand these complex exposure-health relationships and use this information to design disease prevention approaches.

Members

Name Affiliations Research Interests
Ganesa Wegienka, Ph.D., LED Leader Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD), asthma and allergy, women's health epidemiology
Tracie Baker, Ph.D., DVM Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Wayne State University Mechanisms of adult-onset and transgenerational disease due to environmental contaminants
Andrea Cassidy-Bushrow, Ph.D., MPH Assistant Research Scientist, Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System Molecular epidemiology of childhood health disparities, obesity, and cardiovascular disease
Christine Cole Johnson, Ph.D., MPH Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System Effect of the environmental microbiome on the gut microbiome and immunological outcomes, including asthma and allergy in children
Xiaoxia Han, Ph.D. Biostatistician, Henry Ford Health System  
Christine Joseph, Ph.D. Senior Epidemiologist, Department of Public Health Sciences, Henry Ford Health System  
Allen Rosenspire, Ph.D. Research Scientist, Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine  
Douglas Ruden, Ph.D. Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Wayne State University Toxicogenomics of heavy metal exposure using Drosophila and human embryonic stem cell models
Jennifer Straughen, Ph.D. Research Scientist, Henry Ford Health System  
Amy Tang, Ph.D. Biostatistician, Henry Ford Health System  
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Center for Urban Responses to Environmental Stressors